The Feminist Choice

The Feminist Choice
Zoya Salahuddin

Mankind has strived to develop over thousands of years. We have lived through times of rejuvenation and times of turmoil, growing from one to a strong 7.6 billion, and have reached an era of soaring technological heights, where improvement is prevalent in all aspects. Within the perfectly imperfect society we have crafted, the existence of flaws is inevitable. At the core of these flaws sits the inequality ingrained into our norms and morals, set into stone by our forefathers and mothers.

Feminism, a revolutionary movement, began to address many of these inequalities over 20 centuries ago. Although the terms ‘feminist’ and ‘feminism’ were not widely adopted until the 1970s, the movement had already been active for many years prior – it had developed from a plea for women’s inclusion in the upper class to criticisms of the feminine ideal, a concept which continues to plague society to this date. With hundreds of influential leaders pushing forward the necessity for the equality of the sexes, the movement has reached a pivotal point in the 21st century. Over the years, feminism has surpassed what was thought impossible, breaking through barriers of patriarchy and oppression in many societies. However, even today, many women are still held back by the same inequalities we have worked to break through. Still, although we all evidently lead different lives, it is undeniable that we all stand for the same cause – the equality we deserve.

To the little girls who look up to the women that influence their future, feminism is the ability to achieve what was previously not possible. For many others, it means the right to choose and define yourself, without having societal norms and values force you to conform to a set path. To me, feminism means that I write this article and evaluate the term, and gain the same responsibilities and opportunities as my male peers. At THIMUN 2018, hundreds of individuals arrive from every corner of the world to debate to immerse themselves in the issues surrounding the empowerment of women and girls in the world today. Thus, we must continue to break apart the barriers that suppress the voices of millions of girls across the globe. We must ask ourselves, during these three days and every day that follows; what does feminism mean to us? And where would we be without it?